Pickholtz’s book is an engaging and revealing case study in the incredible challenges faced by genetic genealogists studying endogamous populations. Pickholtz uses every DNA test and tool available to break down seemingly impenetrable brick walls and reunite families separated by both space and time.

—Blaine Bettinger, Ph.D., J.D., TheGeneticGenealogist.com

Israel Pickholtz, has written a fascinating book about how he has confirmed and refuted many genealogical connections in his extended Ashkenazi family. He did this by testing every cousin he could. That story is an inspiration to those of us frustrated by using DNA to research our Jewish roots. It is as easy to read as it can be, given that genetic genealogy is not easy to understand

— Kitty Cooper http://blog.kittycooper.com

“ENDOGAMY: One Family, One People” is an excellent resource for those studying endogamous populations, as well as those with a general interest in genetic genealogy. This gem is filled with case studies and wisdom from which we can all learn and apply to our own genealogical DNA research projects.

(A full review by Ms. Tarr can be found in the Fall 2015 issue of FORUM, a quarterly magazine published by the Federation of Genealogical Societies.)

— Julie Cahill Tarr

There are two kinds of people in this world. The kind who detail the many reasons why they can’t do something. And then there is Israel Pickholtz. He simply ignored the naysayers and did it anyway – and quite well. If you think your genetic genealogy is too interwoven, too endogamous or too difficult, then by all means, read how Israel approached the multiple challenges he faced. While you’re reading, you’ll enjoy many interesting success stories. A very encouraging book about solutions, not just about Jewish genetic genealogy.

— Roberta Estes of www.DNAeXplain.com, author of the blog www.dna-explained.com

I like your forward style. I want to say: “Jews quit whining and focus on some processes and procedures to work through the Matches! It only fits together one way – let’s find it!” But that would not be PC. You are working on solutions, so I am a fan.

— Jim Bartlett www.segmentology.org

Did I enjoy this book?  Well, let’s just say when I finished reading it (staying up way later than I should have), I read it a second time to make sure I caught everything.

Pickholtz approaches DNA differently than many genealogists do.  Rather than using DNA in a more self-centered way to find relatives, he uses it to connect distinct branches.  He uses DNA from known cousins to both add additional ammunition to posited relationships as well as to completely destroy hypotheses.  He has particular goals and clearly lays out his thought process allowing the reader to utilize these methods as well.

— Lara Diamond, Lara's Family Search http://larasgenealogy.blogspot.com

Veteran genealogist Israel Pickholtz describes his personal journey in which he explores the intersection of documentary genealogy and the latest developments in autosomal DNA. He brings to the task an openness for possibilities on the one hand, as well as a passion for rigor on the other. I recommend the book to genealogists — novice and expert alike — seeking a friendly armchair companion in their own journeys. The sometimes conflicting and ambiguous results of his documentary and DNA research represents the future of genealogy.

— Adam Brown, Managing Editor, Avotaynu Online

Israeli genealogy researchers who are not yet confident using DNA testing will be convinced of its importance as a research tool after reading this book. For those of us wrestling to identify our surnameless grandmothers and great-grandmothers, the explanations and examples which Pickholtz brings leave no doubt that if we choose our test-takers wisely, there are results to be had.

— Dr. Lea Haber Gedalia, Past-President Israel Genealogical Society